A place where we belong: CU psychologists seek solutions to help women succeed in STEM

Above: President Obama at the 2012 White House Science Fair  Kristin Schwartz is exceptional. Yes, she is good at her job, but as a female engineer she is also literally an exception in her field: a woman succeeding in one of the workforce’s last male strongholds. “I’ve always worn it as a badge of honor,” said Schwartz, who graduated from the University of Colorado Boulder … Continue reading A place where we belong:
CU psychologists seek solutions to help women succeed in STEM

A little more adventurous: how a microbiologist is using science to make beer fun

Dan Driscoll is a science guy first and a beer guy second.  Sure, he’ll wax poetic about Belgian quadruples and bourbon stouts, but what Avery Brewing’s quality assurance manager really wants to talk about is microbiology and yeast.  “Some yeasts like fermenting warmer, some like colder, some produce higher ester compounds, some banana flavors, some clove flavors, some are really clean and don’t produce a … Continue reading A little more adventurous: how a microbiologist is using science to make beer fun

CU scientists travel the globe to explore life in Antarctica’s cryoconite “gunk”

Above: McMurdo Station courtesy of Gaelen Marsden for Wikimedia Commons Late last month a group of Colorado scientists embarked on a journey a third of the way around the planet, all to explore gunk-filled holes in vast Antarctic glaciers. To many of us, the area these scientists travelled to, Antarctica’s McMurdo Dry Valleys, represents absolute desolation. It’s hard to imagine why anyone would chose to … Continue reading CU scientists travel the globe to explore life in Antarctica’s cryoconite “gunk”

Science brief: New study suggests the pill could make you smarter

If I were a contestant on Family Feud and the category was “things you can eat to become smarter,” here’s what I’d say: spinach, salmon, avocados and maybe fish oil supplements. One thing that I would never think of is hormonal birth control, but according to a recent study, that would be a solid answer. Earlier this month, a team of researchers published an article … Continue reading Science brief: New study suggests the pill could make you smarter

Science brief: CU researchers explore ways to support women in STEM

About 20 percent of women earn Bachelor’s degrees in STEM – science, technology, engineering and mathematics – based fields. Several psychologists at the University of Colorado are compiling research on what factors prevent women from earning STEM degrees and how educators might be able to help. In a paper published last August, CU researchers emphasized the importance a feeling of belonging can have for women … Continue reading Science brief: CU researchers explore ways to support women in STEM

Today in science: Despite what Trump tweets, climate change is not a hoax

With more than 80 million people watching, Hillary Clinton accused Donald Trump of calling climate change a hoax during the candidates’ first presidential debate Monday evening. Trump denied the claim, prompting fact checkers from all corners of the Internet to rehash tweets and statements in which the Republican candidate mocked global warming as a joke; sometimes implying a conspiracy. In 2014 Trump tweeted, “This very … Continue reading Today in science: Despite what Trump tweets, climate change is not a hoax

Science brief: New study tracing the roots of human violence reveals the “most murderous mammal”

Imagine you’re having a nightmare about being trapped with an animal. What do you picture? Perhaps a rhino, with its massive jaws gaping open, or a snake coiling tighter and tighter, or a shark headed straight for your boogie board. For me it’s a mountain lion, stalking me and my dog from the shadows of the large boulders I jog past on my favorite mountain … Continue reading Science brief: New study tracing the roots of human violence reveals the “most murderous mammal”